Tag Archives: electricity bill

How to read your SRP electricity bill

Reading Time: 6 minutes

If you live in Phoenix and don’t pay Arizona Public Service (APS) for electricity, chances are you’re an electricity customer of Salt River Project (SRP): this public utility company, which also supplies water, delivers electricity to more than 1 million customers in the region. 

Continue reading
how to read your sdg&e bill

How to read your SDG&E bill

Reading Time: 6 minutes

San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) is the third largest utility company in the Golden State. Based in San Diego, they provide natural gas and electricity to about 3.3 million people in San Diego and southern Orange County.

Many electricity customers throughout the country receive their electric bill every month and pay it without really diving into the details of what they’re actually paying for…and we’re here to help break it down. In this article, we’ll review the most important parts of your SDG&E electricity bill, and how that changes once you install solar panels.

Continue reading
saving energy with energysage

Saving Energy with EnergySage, part 6: Heating & Cooling

Reading Time: 3 minutes

This post is the sixth in our series about how to save on your energy bills even when you’re spending more time at home, as the entire EnergySage team is, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic (here are the first, second, third, fourth, and fifth.) Continue to check our blog for more ideas for how you can take control of your energy bills in the coming weeks. 

Continue reading

Saving Energy with EnergySage, part 4: Home appliances

Reading Time: 3 minutes

This post is the fourth in our series about how to save on your energy bills even when you’re spending more time at home, as the entire EnergySage team is, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic (here are the first, second, and third.) Continue to check our blog for more ideas for how you can take control of your energy bills in the coming weeks. 

Continue reading
saving energy with energysage part 2

Saving energy with EnergySage, part 2: Consumption monitoring

Reading Time: 4 minutes

This post is the second in our series about how to save on your energy bills even when you’re spending more time at home, as the entire EnergySage team is, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. (Here’s the first.) Continue to check our blog for more ideas for how you can take control of your energy bills in the coming weeks

Continue reading
saving energy with energysage part 1

Saving energy with EnergySage, part 1: What’s on your bill?

Reading Time: 4 minutes

This post is the first in our series about how to save on your energy bills even when you’re spending more time at home, as the entire EnergySage team is, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Continue to check our blog for more ideas for how you can take control of your energy bills in the coming weeks

You may have heard that the world is basically on pause right now. The impact of the global pandemic caused by the COVID-19 virus appears to be vast, far-reaching, and multilayered, including in some ways that you may not anticipate. For instance, with so many Americans now working from home or sheltering in place, one way you may see the impact of the pandemic personally is in how your energy bills change now that you’re spending more time at home. 

Continue reading
pg&e electric bill

How to read your PG&E bill

Reading Time: 6 minutes

If you live in California, there’s a good chance that you’re a customer of Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E). This company, based in San Francisco, provides natural gas and electricity to about 16 million people throughout northern California, making it one of the largest utilities in the United States.

Continue reading
electric bill with solar panels

How much is your electric bill after going solar?

Reading Time: 4 minutes

One of the most common misconceptions about solar is that people who install panels no longer receive an electricity bill from their utility company. This isn’t true in most cases: the majority of solar panel systems in the U.S. are grid-tied, allowing customers to draw electricity from the grid when their solar panels aren’t producing enough electricity.

Continue reading